H1N1 flu

Wednesday, May 06, 2009

I had first heard about the Swine Flu from my father in-law a couple of weeks back. Crazy to think that I hadn’t heard it myself from news or the internet - especially with how big it’s getting. I have been following the statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. I am particularly interested because I am planning on visiting some family in New Jersey in the very near future - with my baby.

Since yesterday, there has been 200 additional cases added to the statistics, with one more death added to the toll. But after googling the news regarding this flu, Bloomberg says that it’s because test kits had been sent out so more labs were equipped to identify infected people. Whereas previously only the CDC lab in Atlanta could identify the strain.

It’s crazy to think that this whole thing started in one country and have now spread to 23 countries. Disease trackers are now trying to determine whether the virus has now established itself outside of North America, and if so, the World Health Organization would declare a pandemic - the first since 1968!

It makes me think, what should I do to protect myself and those I love. When SARS was here in Toronto, some people took, what I felt, were extreme measures - wearing face masks everywhere, staying at home away from the public. But now that I have a baby, I don’t want to stupid either. All I’ve heard and found is to consistently practice hand washing thoroughly (as long as it takes you to sing yourself “Happy Birthday” apparently), if you cough or sneeze to make sure you cover your mouth with hand or arm, and if you develop any flu-like symptoms to STAY HOME. It’s much too important that we keep this from spreading to other people.

For more information, take a look at the CDC website.

5 comments:

  1. The last innoculation they did in 1976 for the swine flu, 1 person died of the swine flu. 25 people died from the vaccination, countless others were in critical condition because of it. Then the government finally suspended the program, assuring the public that the 25 people who died from the vaccine was not significant and that the flu would have killed them regardless.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Jeff,

    I appreciate your comments.
    1976, however, was 23 years ago. You should read some of the things that babycare books from back then taught (my parents have a book from 1969)!

    I know your stance on inoculation in general. But studies are showing that due to not inoculating children with the standard vaccines are actually bringing diseases back that should no longer exist among children today. The worst part is that children should are not inoculated become vulnerable to the diseases and infect children who have been vaccinated. See dooce.com (http://www.dooce.com/2009/04/07/word-or-two-about-vaccinations) about a lengthy discussion.

    Yet still... I am not sure that I would get the H1N1 vaccine, since I am not one to get the regular seasonal Flu vaccine either. I would probably talk to my doctor, rather than rely on my own (unqualified) medical advice.

    Again, thanks for the comments. Discussion is so important and I'm glad that you decided it was important enough to voice your opinion.
    Kathy.

    ReplyDelete
  3. yeah with vaccinations its such a touchy subject, i used to have faith in them and no longer do, but i guess its kind of like the God existence debate, one can think 'how do they not get it?' while the other side is thinking along the same lines too.=)

    ReplyDelete
  4. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  5. hi kathy. while studying for immunology i posted on the vaccination debate, but it was super long and after reading more about immunology, there is so much to the argument that can't really be summarized here (at least not by me). so i deleted my post.
    you haven't posted in a while, i hope you're well!

    ReplyDelete

Hey, thanks for leaving a comment.